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Arm’s new ASR game scaling technology builds on AMD’s FSR2, an open-source solution optimized for lower-power devices

Arm has just introduced its own upscaling technology based on AMD’s FSR2, called Arm Accuracy Super Resolution (Arm ASR). Unlike AMD’s upscaler, which is primarily aimed at PCs and high-end consoles, Arm’s implementation of the temporal upscaler is focused on mobile applications, allowing lightweight devices to run the technology despite requiring more processing power. The company has also made it available to developers via an open source license, allowing them to implement it in their games without additional licensing costs.

Arm chips are traditionally found in smartphones and tablets. These devices typically use smaller screens and lower resolutions, making upscaling unnecessary. However, recent advances are pushing the limits of Arm processors. Apple’s M-series chips, for example, are pushing the limits of Arm chips in laptops and desktops. The company even added a Game Mode to macOS Sonoma to encourage more people to play on their MacBooks. We’re also now seeing AAA titles, previously the domain of gaming PCs and full-fledged consoles, being brought to mobile.

(Photo source: Arm)

Since Arm ASR is purpose-built for mobile devices, it can perform better than AMD FSR2. According to Arm’s internal tests with an Immortalis-G720 GPU at 2800 x 1260 resolution, Arm ASR delivers 53% more frames at 2x scaling, compared to FSR2’s 36%. Arm also tested the technology with a MediaTek Dimensity 9300 chip, with ASR 2x showing a more than 20% drop in power consumption compared to rendering a scene at native 1080p.

This development is crucial for mobile devices that run mainly on batteries, as it will reduce power consumption and allow users to play longer. It will also reduce thermal throttling and prevent smartphones and tablets from getting unpleasantly hot during long gaming sessions.

(Photo source: Arm)

This isn’t the first upscaling technology designed for mobile phones, as Qualcomm previously introduced its own Snapdragon Game Super Resolution in 2023. However, Qualcomm’s solution uses spatial upscaling, which focuses on efficiency rather than quality. Arm ASR, on the other hand, uses temporal upscaling, which integrates with the game engine to deliver higher quality at the cost of higher performance requirements.